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Dec 7, 2013

How Electronic Cigarettes Can Help Ladies Protect Their Looks



Everyone’s aware that smoking damages the lungs and causes a wide range of health problems including heart disease and blocked arteries, but how many are aware that smoking also affects their looks adversely? It would seem as though many people, including appearance conscious women, are completely unaware how smoking affects their skin and detracts from their appearance over time. After all, there’s little point to spending money on moisturisers and creams if you’re only going to put poisons in your body that detract from your beautification efforts.

How smoking ruins your looks
Bags under your eyes – According to a John Hopkins study, smokers are four times more likely than non-smokers to feel unsatisfactorily rested after a night’s sleep. This is typically the result of nicotine withdrawals kicking in during the night.

Greater risk of psoriasisThis is a nasty autoimmune-related skin condition that can be caused by other factors and not only smoking, however, smokers are at greater risk of psoriasis than non-smokers. The risk goes up 20 percent for pack-a-day smokers for the first ten years and then 60 percent after that.

No more natural glow – Have you ever wondered why smokers’ skin looks so sallow and washed out? Smoking leaves skin dry and discoloured because the carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke reduces oxygen whilst nicotine reduces blood flow. What’s more, smoking destroys Vitamin C which deprives skin of its natural glow and leaves it ashen and sickly. 

Stained teeth – Everyone should be aware of how nicotine stains teeth (in addition to tainting their breath) and the longer you smoke the more costly it becomes to have your teeth professionally cleaned.

Thinner hair – Not only do the toxic chemicals in cigarettes result in thinning hair but smokers are also much more likely to develop grey hair early on. Furthermore, a study in Taiwan found that male smokers are nearly twice as likely to go bald than men who don’t smoke.

Wrinkles and premature aging – Smoking wrinkles are caused by narrowing blood vessels in the outer layer of the skin which results in less blood, oxygen and fewer nutrients reaching the skin. On average, smokers look 1.4 years older than non-smokers and they’re also likely to develop a yellowy complexion. Yuck!

How to quit
Smokers no doubt know why it’s in their best interests to quit smoking but actually getting around to quitting is often put off or neglected out of fear. Smokers understandably fear withdrawal and if you’ve smoked in the past or are still a smoker you’ll probably have experience with nicotine withdrawal in some form or fashion – on a long flight or bus ride, abortive or successful attempts to quit – and know how uncomfortable nicotine withdrawal can make you feel.

Ridding your body of nicotine is advisable for so many reasons; however, many smokers have found that in order to quit they need to use alternatives for an interim period. Popular alternatives include nicotine gum, which has been used for quite some time by smokers attempting to quit the habit, as well as switching from tobacco cigarettes to an electronic cigarette, a very popular choice in recent years. Both alternatives are much better choices than smoking and although they can both help ladies to protect their looks to a great extent in comparison, they’re still putting nicotine – a noxious and poisonous chemical – into their bodies and that will always detract from their natural appearance over time.

Consider e-cigs as a less harmful alternative to cigarettes though bear in mind that if you really want to protect your looks you’ll need to kick your addiction to nicotine completely.

About the Author:
A company that makes use of pharmaceutical grade ingredients in their products, NUCIG is a reputable provider of electronic cigarette kits, e-liquids and accessories to clients across the UK.

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